Releasement Ceremony to Let Go

Blessings on this Full Moon.

In lunar ceremony last night in the largest sister circle I’ve ever been a part of we were asked to partner with someone and share what we are releasing to the Full Moon. My sister and I dropped in to the depths of our souls in seconds. We shared profound desires to dissolve obstacles to our happiness. We gazed into one another’s eyes and took turns holding space so we would each be seen. Letting Go to release old patterns isn’t easy, but together with over a hundred women we supported one another to surrender to the fire that which no longer serves us. Aho. Namaste.

Some of my Let Go List I share here:

I let go of the need to know why things happen.

I let go of what I don’t want.

I let go of repressed emotions.

I let go of the need to know the outcome.

I let go of the need to be needed.

I let go of extreme self sacrifice.

I let go of holding back.

I let go of being angry.

I let go for my need for approval.

I let go of displacement.

I let go of numbing out.

I let go of the details.

I let go of fitting in.

I let go of over controlling.

I let go of my worry.

I let go of my fear.

I let go of my guilt.

I let go of blame.

I let go of my resistance.

I let go of frustration.

I let go of negative thoughts.

I let go of needing to be acknowledged.

I let go of insecurity.

I let go of the old dominant story.

I let go of not being good enough.

I let go of the pain.

#letgo #releasing #fullmoon #transformation #change #surrender #Iletgo #ritual #ceremony #sistercircle #kurmasana #ubud #bali #goddess #femininerising #divinefeminine

Women Supporting Women Changes the World

Sometimes I think it was all a dream.
Living in a joyful, peaceful place with an abundance of #sisters to call friends.

Then I remember by seeing this that it’s real. So let’s root for each other and watch each other grow because when women support each other, incredible things happen. 💕

“I am a Woman Phenomenally. Phenomenal Woman, that’s me.” ―Maya Angelou

“A woman with a voice is, by definition, a strong woman.” —Melinda Gates

“Women are always saying,’We can do anything that men can do’ but men should be saying,’We can do anything that women can do.'”‬ —Gloria Steinem

“There is no limit to what we, as women, can accomplish.” —Michelle Obama

“Human rights are women’s rights and women’s rights are human rights, once and for all.” —Hillary Clinton

#ischia #italy #summer2018 #blueskyday

Sedona Yoga Festival February 2018 Use My Discount

It’s time to purchase your tickets for Sedona Yoga Festival!

I can’t wait to hug you Feb 8-11, 2018!
Go here: http://sedonayogafestival.com/purchase-tickets/
Use my code ALCHEMY for a loving Discount.
Take a peek at some of my workshops 🙂
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1.) Grow Your Happy: Kundalini Vinyasa Fusion
Yoga teaches us that Happiness is our natural alchemy!
Through #Kundalini and #Vinyasa Yoga, mantra meditation and pranayama we will focus on the last three niyamas necessary for bringing about real, lasting change and cultivating inner joy. Expect upbeat music, loads of laughter and inspiring talk story. Join me to #GrowYourHappy!
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2.) How to be a Successful Yoga Teacher: Authenticity, Abundance and Sustainability
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Yoga teachers can know all the philosophy and inteligent asana alignment specifics in the world, but many are still at risk of being less dynamic than they could be, and blocking the opportunities and abundance that want to come to them, but can’t. This is because they fall into patterns that don’t serve them such as teaching like everyone else, teaching too much, getting burnt out and not being able to find what makes them special. Therefore, classes don’t build as much as they could, students come and go, instructors have to work harder, not smarter, and it’s less satisfying to teach at all.
In this full day intensive, Silvia Mordini, a well loved “Teacher of Teachers” worldwide, shares all her secrets with you. Learn her best advice gathered from 20 years and over 11,000 hours of teaching. A serial Yogapreneur, Silvia had a 13 year Human Resource career, owned 2 Yoga Studios, founded Alchemy Tours, a 10 year old Spiritual Adventure company and developed the 13 year old international Alchemy of Yoga Teacher Training School.

1. She will reveal practical ways to elevate your teaching from good to great!
2. The Essence of great teaching: 5 qualities of Great Teachers
3. How to stay inspired and maintain sustainability
4. The Psychologically Healthy and Authentic Teacher: Acheiving clarity around your Teacher Mission Statement
5. The Psychologically Sound Classroom: Teaching to the Heart of the Student; Creating a Safe & Sacred Space; Assessment of Class Energy, Mood, Style; Teacher & Student Relationship; Honoring the Sacred Seat of the Teacher; Ethical Relationships & Boundaries
6. How to work smarter and gain financial prosperity
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3) Alchemy of Balance: Elements, Chakras and Energy Medicine
Experience the 5 elements (Space, Air, Fire, Water and Earth), 4 directions (South, West, North, East), and Chakras as an inner and outer map of transformation. These are archetypal and energetic maps that are as metaphorical as they are very real and embodied. Everything we see, taste, touch, feel, and do can be interpreted through the gateway of the elements, directions, and chakras.
During this workshop, we will take time to learn how to tap into these sacred relationships and how to align ourselves in understanding their Alchemy in order to gain insight into healing our body, psyche, emotions, and through us our world.

Each direction can be correlated with a different season, a chakra, an element, a moon phase, a unique stage of development, a physical aspect of our embodiment, and an archetypal qualities.
This Alchemy is a guide to life and to living life from a connected, simple place rooted in the body, and resourcing from the shared experience of all organic processes in spiritual rhythm with Nature.
This workshop opens with a Sacred Circle, call to the Four Directions, and intention setting. We will explore through movement the vibrant practice of Mandala Namaskar, a circular, fluid Vinyasa sequence that includes twists, spirals, flow motion within asanas, culminating in a joyful balance of strength, grace, and creativity that reflects the pulsing rhythms of nature: who is made up of earth, water, fire, air, 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Chakras. Expect inspirational music, creative asana and talk story.
Join me to learn practical energy medicine and experience the wisdom each direction, element and chakra holds for you to live a peaceful, happy life!

I Vow to Remain Empowered by the Light of my Soul

On the cusp of the Winter #solstice I renew my vow to remain empowered by the light of my soul and stay true to myself. I know the relationship I’m having with myself is mirrored back by the relationships I attract. If I honor my heart then I am modeling how I should be treated. Here’s to ☀️Growing the light! ☀️
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“May the light within you guide your way on. Because when you look to the outside for light, there is a possibility that you may be blinded and exploited. But one thing shall never betray a woman: her own light and her own radiance as a woman. If the light within you can guide you, you will definitely excel. The time has come when this exploitation must stop. The time has come when a daughter should be treated as a daughter, a mother should be treated as a mother, a wife should be treated as a wife, and over and above all, woman should be treated as a woman.” -Yogi Bhajan
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I bow to the longtime SUN.
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#divinefeminine #sacredfeminine #respect #kundalini #yoga


Photo credit Greg Love @iamgreglove

White Goddess Series Low Lunge Give Peace a Chance

Peace is not something you wish for; It’s something you make, Something you do , Something you are, And something you give away.
#JohnLennon
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What to do?
#teachpeace make your life an example. 
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Lens #anjaneyasana #GivePeaceAChance

White Goddess Miracle Mantra Pose

I’m calling it in. 🌈❤️
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Complete Miracle #Mantra:
Dhan dhan raam daas gur jin siri-aa tinai savaari-aa
Pooree hoee karaamaat aap sirajanhaarai dhaari-aa
Sikhee atai sangatee paarbrahm kar namasakaari-aa
Atal athaa-o atol too tayraa ant na paaraavaari-aa
Jinee too sayvi-aa bhaa-o kar say tudh paar utaari-aa
Lab lobh kaam krodh mo maar kadhay tudh saparvaari-aa
Dhan so tayraa thaan hai sach tayraa paisakaari-aa
Naanak too lehanaa toohai gur amar too veechaari-aa
Gur dithaa taa man saadhaari-aa
Language: Gurmukhi
Source: Siri Guru Granth Sahib
This Meditation is in praise of Guru Ram Das who is able to manifest miracles. This shabd (prayer) is chanted to bring miracles into your life.
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Lens #bali #kundalini #yoga #miracles #alchemyofyoga
Villa Tanah Shanti

What Turns You On?

In myth, Lakshmi, goddess of #abundance was born from the ocean of milk that the gods had churned for 1000 years. That “milk” is the sweetness of this world. From that ocean of being, all Fortune arises–hence Lakshmi arises.
 
Because people #desire and take pleasure in #fortune, she is also the Goddess of desire and pleasure, hence the #Tantrik goddess who is parallel to Lakshmi is called Kamakhya (a name whose root we know from Kama Sutra, a manual on the pursuit of desires).
 
We often find her depicted with four arms, which are symbolic of her fertility and power generally and specifically they are representative of the four aims of life: pleasure (kama), social responsibility (dharma), vocation (artha), and ultimate liberation (moksha). She holds #lotuses, symbols of the world’s #fertility.
 
Join me to learn and more importantly feel more of what turns you on. Connect back with the heart of your desires no matter what challenges have brought you here today.
What are you giving birth to this year? A new book, home, job?
#YogaWorkshop Drinking the Lotus: Alchemy of Love
(Inspired by #Lakshmi) Hosted by Northwest Yoga Conference 🙂
 
*If you’d like me to bring this workshop to your local studio please pm me 206 886 5743 or email hello@alchemytours.com*
 alchemyof-love_nwyc2017

Full Moon Releasement Ritual

Full Moon Releasement Ritual
The night of a full moon create a sacred and safe place were you can perform the Letting Go ceremony, preferably outdoors where you can receive the moonlight and feel protected by its energy.
For the ceremony you will need:
1. Sage smudge sticks or favorite incense.
2. A fire pit or a cooking pot or even the barbeque will work
3. Water to put out the fire afterward and as general safety precaution
4. Paper where you’ve written down what you want to surrender to the fire.
 
Recapitulation Preparation:
1. Call upon your guides to ask them to help you identify everything you need to release through this ceremony.
2. Meditate or pray before you begin.
3. Write down the names of those people you need to forgive for any reason.
4. Write down what you forgive yourself for. (eg Negative self-take or unhealthy habits)
5. Write down anger, fears or worries about any situations that are blocking you or keeping you from fully loving your life
 
When you finish, thank your guides for all their help. Then cut every name and every issue making separate slips of paper. You can do this the same day of a full moon or the day before. You will begin the process of releasing from the moment you start writing your list and setting the intention that you want to release.
 
Call upon your guides (eg your angels, Ganesha) for protection and guidance to help you remove any obstacles that could be blocking you in your path, ask for help from any other beings of light that could help you in the process of releasement.
 
Ritual:
1. Burn some Sage. Smudge yourself and the sacred space where you are going to perform the ceremony.
2. Say your intentions or prayer in letting go of negative emotions, addictions, or attitudes from your life.
3. Visualize yourself completely covered with a beautiful white light. Breathe the energy of the full moon.
4. When you feel ready start reading -out loud- one by one the words that you have written in each slip of paper. After you have read the first slip, set it on fire with a lighter and place it your fire pit, toss one by one after you read it. You can even say aloud “I surrender to the fire….or it’s gone.”
 
Look how the pieces of paper are burning, becoming ashes while the smoke goes into the sky. The same is happening to every thing you wrote on those slips they are vanishing from your life and your guides and the other beings of light are taking them to the light for its transmutation and transformation in pure positive energy: love, forgiveness, compassion, healing, trust and faith.
 
Say thank you to all the beings of light that were with you tonight assisting you in this ceremony. Put out the fire with water if necessary.
 
Rest easy. You are again born into this new moment to begin again.
 
See more, download Full Moon PDF from my website http://www.silviamordini.com
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Until Energy is Impregnated with Consciousness it is Blind

Invoking the balance of stability and flexibility, sleeping energy and action #shiva and #shakti #mudras and #crown and #root #chakras. In other words, unlimited abundance.

Lens #bali #chakravinyasa offered on my #yogaretreats and at #yogaconferences, festivals worldwide

SHIVA symbolises consciousness, the masculine principle.
SHAKTI symbolises the feminine principle, the activating power and energy.

Whenever a power becomes active, and wherever energy exists, Shakti is working. Other terms for these primal principles are PURUSHA and PRAKRITI; Purusha is consciousness and Prakriti is nature.

Shiva is generally portrayed holding a trident, which represents the trinity of Īshwara, Purusha and Prakriti.

Īshwara is the omnipresent, eternal, formless divine principle; Purusha is the Ātmā and Prakriti is the manifestation, nature. An electric light can be used to explain their relationship. The electric current, which is the source of the light, is Īshwara; the light is Purusha, and the object that is illuminated is Prakriti.

SHAKTI (or Prakriti) means energy, power, movement, change, nature. It is the maternal principle – the provider, abundance. In the human as well as in the animal kingdom the mother offers nourishment, warmth and security.

SHIVA (or Purusha), on the other hand, is pure consciousness – the unchanging, unlimited and unswayable observer. Purusha has no desires whatsoever; these are inherent only in Prakriti. Purusha is the empty, clear screen onto which Prakriti projects her colourful film.

Shiva and Shakti are manifestations of the all-in-one divine consciousness. The left side is the Divine Mother, Pārvatī, the “feminine” energy, and the right side represents Shiva, the “masculine” consciousness.

Only when Shiva and Shakti combine can action, movement and creation arise. Until energy is impregnated with consciousness it is ignorant, disordered, aimless and “blind”. Energy alone can produce nothing; consciousness bestows upon it content, form and direction. Conversely, consciousness without energy is dormant power, sleeping energy, and on its own is unable to be the cause of anything. Just as Prakriti without Purusha is unable to act, and vice versa, Purusha without Prakriti is also incapable of creating anything.

Shiva resides in the Sahasrāra Chakra and Shakti in the Mūlādhāra Chakra. When Prakriti and Purusha unite in the Sahasrāra Chakra, knowledge, knower and the object of knowledge become one. Once we have experienced this no desires remain within us because we realise unequivocally that everything we have ever yearned for is carried within us. In this state of absolute consciousness there are no polarities and therefore no more sorrows; there is only everlasting joy, unconditional love, unlimited compassion and total understanding for all living beings.
For as long as consciousness is connected to the physical body it is unable to remain constantly in the Sahasrāra Chakra and so returns to the residence of the Ātmā in the Heart Centre (Anāhata Chakra). A realised person always thinks, feels and acts from the heart. Embedded in eternal love and eternal happiness, that person is always conscious of the immortal Ātmā, the ocean of bliss, and their consciousness is forever connected to the divine consciousness.

Mary Magdalene Uffizi

I am always learning and am inspired by the teachings of both the sacred masculine and sacred feminine.
Lens: ‪#‎MaryMagdalene‬ ‪#‎uffizi‬

Introduction to Secrets of Mary Magdalene
By Elaine H. Pagels

Who was she, that elusive–and fascinating– woman in the circle around Jesus of Nazareth? For nearly two thousand years, Mary Magdalene has lived in the imagination of Christians as a seductive prostitute; in our own time, contemporary fiction pictures her as Jesus’ lover and wife, mother of his children. Yet the earliest sources that tell of Mary Magdalene–both within the New Testament and outside of it—do not describe either of these sexualized roles, suggesting that the woman herself, and how we have come to see her, is more complex than most of us ever imagined. Was she, then, one of Jesus’ followers, whose wealth helped support him, as the earliest New Testament gospel, the Gospel of Mark, says? A madwoman who had been possessed by seven devils, as Luke says? Or Jesus’ closest disciple, the one he loved more than any other, as the Gospel of Mary Magdalene tells us? Or, in the words of the Dialogue of the Savior, “the woman who understood all things”?

When we investigate the earliest available records, we find all of these conflicting images, and more. What we discover, too, is that which answer we find depends on where we look. What is probably the earliest story comes from the New Testament Gospel of Mark, written about forty years after Jesus’ death. Mark tells us that while Roman soldiers were crucifying Jesus Mary Magdalene stood among a group of women watching the execution, grieving, although the male disciples had fled in fear for their lives. Standing with Salome and another woman named Mary (the mother of James and Joseph), Mary Magdalene continued her vigil until Jesus finally died; later, along with her companions, she saw his body carefully wrapped in strips of linen, entombed, and sealed into a cave cut out of rock.

Mark explains that Mary, Salome, and “the other Mary” were among those who “followed Jesus and provided for him”– probably meals and a place to stay, perhaps money for necessities—when he was in Galilee. The morning after Sabbath, the women came to offer their teacher the final service, bringing aromatic spices to complete his burial. But Mark’s account ends on a note of confusion and shock: finding the tomb open, the body gone, the women, hearing that Jesus “is not here; he has risen,” run away, shaking with terror, “for trembling and astonishment came upon them, and they said nothing to anyone, for they were terrified.”

Matthew, who wrote his version with Mark’s account before him, repeats the same story but changes the troubling ending. Mary and her companions did leave the tomb quickly, he says, but did so “with fear and great joy.” And instead of intending to say nothing, they immediately run “to tell his disciples Then, while they were on the way, the risen Jesus himself appeared before them, and spoke to them.
Luke, like Matthew, has Mark’s story before him, but has something different in mind when he revises Mark. To make clear to the reader that women—any woman, much less Mary—could not be among Jesus’ disciples, Luke initially leaves out Mark’s comment that Mary, Salome, and the other Mary “followed Jesus” (since saying this could be understood to place them among the disciples). Then Luke deliberately contrasts “the twelve”– the men whom he says Jesus named as disciples–with those he calls “the women,” whom he classifies among the needy, sick, and crazed members of the crowds that pressed themselves upon Jesus and his disciples. Thus, Luke, unlike Mark, says that Mary came to Jesus driven by demonic spirits, and as only one among “some women who had been healed from evil spirits and from illnesses,” Luke identifies these women as “Mary, called Magdalene, from whom seven demons had gone out, and Joanna…and Susanna, and many others,” who, he concedes, “provided for (Jesus and his disciples) from their resources.”

When Luke tells the story of Jesus’ crucifixion and death, he changes three passages in which Mark had named Mary Magdalene, leaving her nameless in each of these three stories, standing among an anonymous group he calls “the women.”

Only after the anonymous women testify about what they saw to “the eleven” (the inner circle that Luke had called “the twelve” until Judas Iscariot, who betrayed Jesus, had left them) does Luke name three women. For at this point, apparently, their witness matters to validate their testimony and he now names the three that he sees as the most prominent: Mary Magdalene, Mary, the mother of James and Joseph, and Joanna. Although Luke, like John, sometimes speaks positively about “the women,” we may wonder why, at other times, he denigrates Mary and downplays her role.

Now, thanks to the recent discovery of other ancient gospels—gospels not included in the New Testament, which remained virtually unknown for nearly two thousand years until their recent discovery—we may be able to understand what Luke had in mind. For these other gospels, found translated into Coptic in Egypt, originally had been written earlier, in Greek, like the New Testament gospels. Scholars debate when they were written, but generally agree that most of them come from the first two centuries of the Christian movement. What we find in these discoveries is surprising: every one of the recently discovered sources that mention Mary Magdalene– sources that include the Gospel of Mary Magdalene, the Gospel of Thomas, the Gospel of Philip, the Wisdom of Faith, and the Dialogue of the Savior–unanimously picture Mary as one of Jesus’ most trusted disciples. Some even revere her as his foremost disciple, Jesus’ closest confidant, since he found her capable of understanding his deepest secrets. We can see that Luke apparently did not want to acknowledge that some of those he had simply called “the women” previously were actually regarded as disciples themselves. Although in this introduction we cannot discuss these remarkable texts in detail, let us briefly look at each of these gospels in turn.

mary magdalenFirst, the Gospel of Mary Magdalene pictures Mary taking a leading role among the disciples. Finding the male disciples terrified to preach the gospel after Jesus’ death since they feared that they, too, would be arrested and killed, Mary stands up to speak and encourages them, “turning their hearts to the good.” When Peter, acknowledging that “the Lord loved you more than other women,” asks Mary to “tell us what he told you” secretly, Mary agrees. When she finishes, Peter, furious, asks, “Did he really speak privately with a woman, and not openly to us? Are we supposed to turn around and all listen to her? Did he love her more than us?” Distressed at his rage, Mary replies, “My brother Peter, what do you think? Do you think that I thought this up myself in my heart, or that I am lying about the Savior?” Levi breaks in at this point to mediate the dispute: “Peter, you have always been hot-tempered. Now I see you contending against the women like (our) enemies. But if the Savior made her worthy, who are you to reject her? Surely the Lord knew her very well; that is why he loved her more than us.” The Gospel of Mary ends as the others agree to accept Mary’s teaching, and the disciples, including Mary, go forth to proclaim the gospel.
Like the Gospel of Mary, the Gospel of Thomas pictures Mary as one of Jesus’ disciples. Strikingly, it names only six disciples, not twelve, and two of these are women–Mary Magdalene and Salome,. Yet like the dispute between Peter and Mary in the Gospel of Mary Magdalene, several passages in the Gospel of Thomas indicate that at the time it was written, probably around 90-100 C. E., the question of whether women could be disciples already had triggered explosive controversy. In saying 61, for example, Salome asks Jesus to tell her who he is: ”Who are you, man, that you have come up on my couch, and eaten from my table?” Jesus answers, “I come from what is undivided;” that is, from the divine, which transcends gender. He thereby rejects what her question implies—that his identity involves primarily his being male, as hers does being female. Salome instantly understanding what he means, recognizes that the same is true for her. Thus she immediately answers, “I am your disciple.”

Here, too, however, as in the Gospel of Mary, Peter challenges and opposes the presence of women among the disciples. According to saying 114 in The Gospel of Thomas, Peter says to Jesus, “Tell Mary to leave us, for women are not worthy of (spiritual) life.” But instead of dismissing Mary, as Peter insists, Jesus rebukes Peter, and declares, “I will make Mary a living spirit,” so that she—or any woman–may become as capable of spiritual life as any man would have been in first century Jewish tradition .
We find yet another account of an argument in which Peter challenges Mary’s right to speak among the disciples in the dialogue called Wisdom of Faith. Here, after Mary asks Jesus several questions, Peter breaks in, complaining to Jesus that Mary is talking too much and so displacing the rightful priority of Peter and his brother disciples. Yet, here too, just as in the Gospel of Mary Magdalene and the Gospel of Thomas, Peter’s attempt to silence Mary earns him a quick rebuke, this time from Jesus himself. Later, however, Mary admits to Jesus that she hardly dares to speak with him freely, because, she says, “Peter makes me hesitate; I am afraid of him, because he hates the female race.” Jesus replies that whoever the Spirit inspires is divinely ordained to speak, whether man or woman.

This theme of conflict between Mary and Peter that we find in so many sources—conflict involving Peter’s refusal to acknowledge Mary as a disciple, much less as a leader among the disciples–may well reflect what people knew and told about actual conflict between the two. We know, too, that since women often identified with Mary Magdalene, certain people in the movement told such stories about her—or against her—as a way of arguing about whether—or how—women could participate in their circles.

Note, for example, that the very writers who picture Peter as the disciple whom Jesus acknowledges as being their primary leader—namely, the authors of the gospels of Mark, Matthew, and Luke—are the same ones who picture Mary as no disciple at all, but simply as one of “the women,” or, worse, in the case of Luke, someone who had been demon-possessed. What makes their accounts important historically, of course, is that these are three of the gospels that came to be included in the canon of the New Testament—often invoked, even now, to “prove” that women cannot hold positions of authority within Christian churches.”